<< First  < Prev   1   2   Next >  Last >> 
  • February 02, 2017 4:27 PM | Anonymous

    TN Romantic Relationship has selected two recent articles to share with you. Below is our selection of January 2017.

    Article 1 by Bartel et al. (2017): Do romantic partners influence each other's heavy episodic drinking? Support for the partner influence hypothesis in a three-year longitudinal study

    DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.01.020

    Background: Approximately one in five adults engage in heavy episodic drinking (HED), a behavior with serious health and social consequences. Environmental, intrapersonal, and interpersonal factors contribute to and perpetuate HED. Prior research supports the partner influence hypothesis where partners influence each other's HED. Objectives: We examined the partner influence hypothesis longitudinally over three years in heterosexual couples in serious romantic relationships, while exploring possible sex differences in the magnitude of partner influence. Methods: One-hundred-and-seventy-nine heterosexual couples in serious relationships (38.5% married at baseline) completed a measure of HED at baseline and again three years later. Results: Using actor-partner interdependence modelling, results showed actor effects for both men and women, with HED remaining stable for each partner from baseline to follow-up. Significant partner effects were found for both men and women, who both positively influenced their partners' HED over the three-year follow-up. Conclusions: The partner influence hypothesis was supported. Results indicated partner influences on HED occur over the longer term and apply to partners in varying stages of serious romantic relationships (e.g., cohabiting, engaged, married). Women were found to influence their partners' HED just as much as men influence their partners' HED. Findings suggest HED should be assessed and treated as a couples' issue rather than simply as an individual risky behavior.


    Article 2 by Visserman et al (2017): Me or us? Self-control promotes a healthy balance between personal and relationship concerns

    DOI 10.1177/1948550616662121

    Although romantic partners strive to achieve an optimal balance in fulfilling both personal and relational concerns, they are inevitably challenged by how much time and effort they can dedicate to both concerns. In the present work, we examined the role of self-control in successfully maintaining personal–relational balance through promoting balance and preventing personal and relational imbalance (overdedication to personal or relational concerns, respectively). We conducted two studies among romantic couples (total N = 555), using questionnaires and diary procedures to assess everyday experiences of personal-relational balance and imbalance. Both studies consistently showed that self-control promotes personal–relational balance. Moreover, findings partly supported our hypothesis that self-control prevents personal and relational imbalance (Study 2). Finally, findings also revealed that maintaining personal–relational balance is one of the mechanisms by which self-control can promote personal and relationship well-being. Implications of the present findings and avenues for future research are discussed.

    I hope you enjoy our selections!

    Professor Jennifer Connolly, York University, Canada and Dr. Rongqin Yu, University of Oxford, UK


  • January 01, 2017 12:57 AM | Anonymous

    TN Romantic Relationship has selected two recent articles to share with you. Below is our selection of December 2016.

     

    Article 1 by Longmore et al. (2016): A prospective study of adolescents’ sexual partnerships on emerging adults’ relationship satisfaction and intimate partner aggression

    DOI: 10.1177/2167696816631098

     

    We examined whether the influence of adolescents’ sexual partnerships, both dating and casual, carried over to affect emerging adults’ relationship satisfaction and experiences of intimate partner aggression. Analyses of longitudinal data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (n = 294) showed that net of control variables (delinquency, depression, family violence, relational and sociodemographic characteristics), adolescents’ number of dating, but not casual, sexual partners led to greater odds of intimate partner aggression during emerging adulthood. Further, relationship churning (breaking-up and getting back together) and sexual nonexclusivity during emerging adulthood mediated the influence of adolescents’ number of dating sexual partnerships on intimate partner aggression. The positive effect of dating sexual partnerships on intimate partner aggression was stronger for women compared with men. These findings confirm the long reach of adolescent experiences into emerging adulthood.

     

    Article 2 by Rauer et al. (2016): Romantic relationships and alcohol use: A long-term, developmental perspective

    DOI: 10.1017/S0954579416000304

     

    This study considers the developmental origins of alcohol use in young adulthood. Despite substantial evidence linking committed romantic relationships to less problematic alcohol use in adulthood, the uniformity of these protective benefits across different romantic relationships is unclear. Further, the extent to which the establishment and maintenance of these romantic relationships is preceded by earlier adolescence alcohol use remains unknown. To address these gaps in the literature, the current study utilized multiple-dimensional, multiple-informant data spanning 20 years on 585 individuals in the Child Development Project. Findings from both variable- and person-centered analyses support a progression of associations predicting adolescent alcohol use (ages 15–16), drinking, and romantic relationships in early adulthood (ages 18–25), and then problematic young adult alcohol use (age 27). Although adolescent alcohol use predicted greater romantic involvement and turnover in early adulthood, romantic involvement, but not turnover, appeared to reduce the likelihood of later problematic drinking. These findings remained robust even after accounting for a wide array of selection and socialization factors. Moreover, characteristics of the individuals (e.g., gender) and of their romantic relationships (e.g., partner substance use problems and romantic relationship satisfaction) did not moderate these findings. Findings underscore the importance of using a developmental–relational perspective to consider the antecedents and consequences of alcohol use early in the life span.

     

    I hope you enjoy our selections!

    Professor Jennifer Connolly, York University, Canada and Dr. Rongqin Yu, University of Oxford, UK

  • November 30, 2016 4:19 PM | Anonymous

    TN Romantic Relationship has selected two recent articles to share with you. Below is our selection of November 2016.

    Article 1 by Mehta et al. (2016): Daily Affect and Intimacy in Emerging Adult Couples

    DOI 10.1007/s10804-016-9226-9

    The study investigated individual- and couple-level associations between daily intimacy and affective states (N = 2211 observations) in 20 heterosexual emerging adult couples (age 18–25 years, M = 23) who had been in a sexual relationship with one another for at least 3 weeks (M = 12 months). Individual analyses revealed that emerging adults’ feelings of intimacy varied from day to day and that there were no gender differences in daily intimacy. Affect and intimacy were positively associated within day for women, but not for men. Time-lagged individual-level analyses revealed that prior-day positive or negative affect did not predict present-day intimacy for men or women. However, prior-day intimacy positively predicted present-day positive affect in men and negatively predicted present-day negative affect in women. Timelagged couple-level analyses revealed that men’s prior-day positive affect positively predicted their female partner’s present-day intimacy. Women’s prior-day intimacy negatively predicted their male partner’s present-day negative affect.  Implications of the day-to-day associations of intimacy with positive and negative affect within emerging adult couples are discussed

    Article 2 by Guendelman et al. (2015): Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Predicts Intimate Partner Victimization in Young Women

    DOI 10.1007/s10802-015-9984-z

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with interpersonal dysfunction during childhood and adolescence, yet little is known about the romantic relationships of young women with childhood ADHD. In the present study, we draw from a longitudinal sample of girls followed prospectively into young adulthood, comparing those with (n=114) and without (n=79; comparisons) childhood ADHD in terms of their risk for physical victimization by an intimate partner (physical IPV; e.g., slapping, punching) by 17–24 years of age. We examined ADHD both diagnostically and dimensionally, at the same time establishing reliable indicators of young adult physical IPV. Externalizing and internalizing problems, and academic achievement during adolescence, were tested as potential mediators. Overall, participants with a childhood diagnosis of ADHD experienced more physical IPV than did comparisons (30.7 % vs. 6.3 %). In parallel, IPV was associated with higher levels of childhood ADHD symptomatology (d=0.73). Young women with persistent ADHD stood the highest risk of experiencing IPV (37.3 %), followed by those with transient ADHD (19.0 %) and those never-diagnosed (5.9 %). Academic achievement measured during adolescence was a significant partial mediator of the childhood ADHD symptomatology-young adult IPV relationship, even with control of sociodemographic, psychiatric, and cognitive factors, including childhood reading and math disorders. Findings indicate that in young women, childhood ADHD is a specific and important predictor of physically violent victimization in their intimate relationships. This vulnerable population requires IPV prevention and intervention, with academic empowerment as a key target.

    I hope you enjoy our selections!

    Kind regards,

    Professor Jennifer Connolly, York University, Canada and Dr. Rongqin Yu, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

  • October 30, 2016 7:02 AM | Anonymous

    Dear All,

    TN Romantic Relationship has selected two recent articles to share with you.

    Article 1 by Cornelius et al., (2016). Spread of health behaviors in young couples: How relationship power shapes relational influence.

    Doi link: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.07.030

    Introduction: Romantic relationships provide a context in which partners can influence each other's health behaviors (e.g., weight-related behaviors, substance use). Partner influence may be especially pronounced among newly parenting adolescent and young adult couples because of the desire to maintain relationships (and therefore openness to influence), and because parenting-related challenges can pose risk for uptake of unhealthy behaviors. Two understudied factors that might affect partner influence on health behaviors include relative power within the relationship and prior levels of engagement in health behaviors. Methods: The current study explored longitudinal partner influence effects in a sample of newly parenting adolescent and young adult females and their male partners (Ncouples = 157) recruited from four obstetrics/gynecology clinics in Connecticut between July 2007 and February 2011. Five health behaviors in two domains were explored: weight-related behaviors (unhealthy eating, exercise) and substance use (cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use). Relationship power and previous levels of health behaviors were examined as moderators. Variations across gender were also examined. Results: Results of dyadic analysis showed partner influences for alcohol use. Partner influence depended on relationship power for eating, alcohol, and marijuana use, and on previous behavior for cigarette use. Results also varied by gender - only female-to-male influence was found for unhealthy eating and cigarette use. Higher relationship power was protective against smoking escalation for females. Discussion: These results differ from previous research findings mainly on male-to-female influences. Such asymmetries may reflect traditional female dominance in food preparation, as well as shifts in power balances postpartum. Targeting relational power dynamics may buffer the spread and escalation of unhealthy behaviors in young parents, with implications for the health of both members of a couple as well as their children.

    Article 2 by Johnson et al., (2015): The age–IPV curve: Changes in the perpetration of intimate partner violence during adolescence and young adulthood.

    Doi link: 10.1007/s10964-014-0158-z

    Research on intimate partner violence (IPV) has evolved over the last decade with increasing interest in how IPV develops over adolescence and young adulthood. Studies examining patterns of IPV over time have generally focused on victimization with less attention to temporal shifts in perpetration. While it is generally assumed that IPV peaks during young adulthood, this has not been empirically verified and documented. Additionally, prior longitudinal analyses of IPV have focused on identifying trajectories and their accompanying risk factors, with less attention given to within-individual change in IPV experiences across and within relationships. Drawing on five waves of data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study, we examined patterns of the perpetration of IPV among a diverse sample of adolescents and young adults (51.1 % female, 63.9 % non-Hispanic White, 24.6 % non-Hispanic Black, 11.5 % Hispanic) spanning the ages of 13–28 years (N = 1,164). Analyses demonstrated that IPV patterns deviate from the age–crime curve, with women’s involvement in IPV increasing, while their involvement in other antisocial behaviors is decreasing. Traditional behavioral and psychological risk factors (delinquency, alcohol and drug use, depressive symptoms) accounted for some of the age variation in IPV for men, but these factors did not account for age variation in IPV among women. Relationship risk factors including frequency of disagreements, trust, jealousy, validation and self-disclosure, however, accounted for substantial portions of the age–IPV perpetration relationship for male and female youth. These findings reinforce recent calls for prevention efforts that focus on the development and maintenance of healthy relationships.

    We hope you enjoy our selections!

    Professor Jennifer Connolly, York University, Canada and Dr. Rongqin Yu, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

  • September 30, 2016 11:40 AM | Anonymous

    Dear All, 

    TN Romantic Relationship has selected two recent articles to share with you.

    Article 1 by Collibee and Furman (2016): The relationship context for sexual activity and its associations with romantic cognitions among emerging adults. 

    Doi link: 10.1177/2167696815604529

    Few studies have examined the associations of sexual activity with romantic cognitions, particularly longitudinally. We used a multianalytic approach to examine the longitudinal, between-person, and within-person associations between sexual activity and romantic cognitions. We distinguished among sexual activity with four different types of partners—romantic partners, friends, acquaintances, and friends with benefits. An ethnically/racially representative sample of 185 participants (94 males and 91 females) completed questionnaires when they were 2.5, 4, and 5.5 years out of high school. Frequent sexual activity with a romantic partner was associated with positive romantic cognitions, including less avoidant and anxious relational styles, greater romantic life satisfaction, and romantic appeal. Frequent sexual activity with various nonromantic partners was often associated with more negative romantic cognitions, including avoidant styles, lower romantic life satisfaction, and lower romantic appeal. Few longitudinal effects were found. Findings contribute to a developmental task theory conceptualization of sexual behavior.

    Article 2 by Roberts & David (2016). My life has become a major distraction from my cell phone: Partner phubbing and relationship satisfaction among romantic partners

    Doi link: 10.1016/j.chb.2015.07.058

    Partner phubbing (Pphubbing) can be best understood as the extent to which an individual uses or is distracted by his/her cell phone while in the company of his/her relationship partner. The present study is the first to investigate the oft-occurring behavior of Pphubbing and its impact on relationship satisfaction and personal well-being. In Study 1, a nine-item scale was developed to measure Pphubbing. The scale was found to be highly reliable and valid. Study 2 assessed the study's proposed relationships among a sample of 145 adults. Results suggest that Pphubbing's impact on relationship satisfaction is mediated by conflict over cell phone use. One's attachment style was found to moderate the Pphubbing ─ cell phone conflict relationship. Those with anxious attachment styles reported higher levels of cell phone conflict than those with less anxious attachment styles. Importantly, Pphubbing was found to indirectly impact depression through relationship satisfaction and ultimately life satisfaction. Given the ever-increasing use of cell phones to communicate between romantic partners, the present research offers insight into the process by which such use may impact relationship satisfaction and personal wellbeing.

    We hope you enjoy our selections!

    Professor Jennifer Connolly, York University, Canada and Dr. Rongqin Yu, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

  • August 29, 2016 5:41 PM | Anonymous

     Dear All, 

    TN Romantic Relationship has selected two recent articles to share with you.

    Article 1 by Rauer et al. (2016): Romantic relationships and alcohol use: A long-term, developmental perspective

    Doi link: 10.1017/S0954579416000304

    This study considers the developmental origins of alcohol use in young adulthood. Despite substantial evidence linking committed romantic relationships to less problematic alcohol use in adulthood, the uniformity of these protective benefits across different romantic relationships is unclear. Further, the extent to which the establishment and maintenance of these romantic relationships is preceded by earlier adolescence alcohol use remains unknown. To address these gaps in the literature, the current study utilized multitiple-dimensional, multiple-informant data spanning 20 years on 585 individuals in the Child Development Project. Findings from both variable- and person-centered analyses support a progression of associations predicting adolescent alcohol use (ages 15–16), drinking, and romantic relationships in early adulthood (ages 18–25), and then problematic young adult alcohol use (age 27). Although adolescent alcohol use predicted greater romantic involvement and turnover in early adulthood, romantic involvement, but not turnover, appeared to reduce the likelihood of later problematic drinking. These findings remained robust even after accounting for a wide array of selection and socialization factors. Moreover, characteristics of the individuals (e.g., gender) and of their romantic relationships (e.g., partner substance use problems and romantic relationship satisfaction) did not moderate these findings. Findings underscore the importance of using a developmental–relational perspective to consider the antecedents and consequences of alcohol use early in the life span.

    Article 2 by Longmore et al. (2015): A Prospective Study of Adolescents’ Sexual Partnerships on Emerging Adults’ Relationship Satisfaction and Intimate Partner Aggression

    Doi link: 10.1177/2167696816631098

    We examined whether the influence of adolescents’ sexual partnerships, both dating and casual, carried over to affect emerging adults’ relationship satisfaction and experiences of intimate partner aggression. Analyses of longitudinal data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (n = 294) showed that net of control variables (delinquency, depression, family violence, relational and sociodemographic characteristics), adolescents’ number of dating, but not casual, sexual partners led to greater odds of intimate partner aggression during emerging adulthood. Further, relationship churning (breaking-up and getting back together) and sexual nonexclusivity during emerging adulthood mediated the influence of adolescents’ number of dating sexual partnerships on intimate partner aggression. The positive effect of dating sexual partnerships on intimate partner aggression was stronger for women compared with men. These findings confirm the long reach of adolescent experiences into emerging adulthood.

    We hope you enjoy our selections!

    Professor Jennifer Connolly, York University, Canada and Dr. Rongqin Yu, University of Oxford, United Kingdom


  • July 30, 2016 4:24 PM | Anonymous

    Dear all, 

    TN Romantic Relationship has selected two recent articles to share with you.

    Article 1 by Martin-Storey & Fromme (2016): Trajectories of dating violence: Differences by sexual minority status and gender

    Doi link: 10.1016/j.adolescence.2016.02.008

    The purpose of this study was to examine how sexual minority status (as assessed using both identity and behavior) was associated with trajectories of dating violence. University students from a large Southwestern university completed questions on their sexual minority identity, the gender of their sexual partners, and about experiences of dating violence for six consecutive semesters (N = 1942). Latent growth curve modeling indicated that generally, trajectories of dating violence were stable across study participation. Sexual minority identity was associated with higher initial levels of dating violence at baseline, but also with greater decreases in dating violence across time. These differences were mediated by number of sexual partners. Having same and other-sex sexual partners was associated with higher levels of dating violence at baseline, and persisted in being associated with higher levels over time. No significant gender difference was observed regarding trajectories of dating violence.

    Article 2 by Norona et al. (2016). Breaking up in emerging adulthood: A developmental perspective of relationship dissolution

    Doi link: 10.1177/2167696816658585

    Using a unique sample of individuals who have and have not attended college, the present mixed-methods study examined narratives of 113 (47% women) emerging adults’ motivations for initiating breakups with romantic partners. Findings indicated that emerging adults’ motivations for ending their romantic relationships were largely due to their relationships and/or their romantic partners not fulfilling their needs for interdependence. Additionally, unmet intimacy, identity, and autonomy needs were the most frequently reported reasons for relationship termination, indicating that emerging adults consider both their need to be close with others and their need to follow their own paths for their careers and desires for family formation. This study also demonstrated links between perceptions of developmental tasks in emerging adulthood and motivations for ending romantic relationships. Those who end romantic relationships due to unfulfilled intimacy needs tend to be more relationally focused, and those who end romantic relationships due to unfulfilled autonomy or identity needs tend to view emerging adulthood as a time of experimentation/possibilities, feeling ‘‘in between,’’ and negativity/instability.

    We hope you enjoy our selections!

    Professor Jennifer Connolly, York University, Canada and Dr. Rongqin Yu, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

     


  • June 29, 2016 1:39 AM | Anonymous

    Dear all, 

    TN Romantic Relationship has selected two recent articles to share with you.

    Article 1 by Dalenberg et al. (2016): Young people’s everyday romance and sexual experiences in relation to sex-related conversations with parents: a diary study in the Netherlands

    Doi link: 10.1080/14681811.2016.1192026

    This study builds on existing research into how young people’s emergent sexual development is connected to parent–child sexrelated communication through avoidance vs. disclosure. Over the course of one year, a total of 21 young people reported in longitudinal qualitative diaries their (1) everyday sexual experiences and (2) sex-related conversations with their parents. Using a mixed-methods approach, findings show that less sexually experienced participants reported greater avoidance of parent–child sex-related conversations than more experienced participants. The sex-related conversations of more experienced participants mainly concerned overt experiences in the form of everyday issues with their romantic partner, while the conversations of less experienced participants were characterised by more covert experiences such as opinions about romantic relationships in general. These results suggest that the degree to which young people feel comfortable talking about sexuality with their parents partly depends on when the conversation takes place during a young person’s romantic and sexual development.

    Article 2 by Weidmann et al. (2016): Big Five traits and relationship satisfaction: The mediating role of self-esteem

    Doi link: 10.1016/j.jrp.2016.06.001

    This study examined the mediating role of self-esteem in the association between Big Five traits and relationship satisfaction. Using data of 237 heterosexual couples and the Actor-Partner Interdependence Mediation Model (APIMeM), self-esteem mediated the association between Big Five traits and relationship satisfaction. We also tested the directionality of the association using longitudinal data of 141 couples. Results indicate that only agreeableness (and neuroticism marginally) predicts relationship satisfaction two years later, but relationship satisfaction predicted partner’s extraversion. Further, significant indirect effects emerged between relationship satisfaction, self-esteem, and later neuroticism. These results underline the importance of studying Big Five traits and self-esteem conjointly when studying relationship satisfaction. Furthermore, testing for alternative longitudinal associations elucidates the role of romantic relationships in personality development. 

    We hope you enjoy our selections!

    Professor Jennifer Connolly, York University, Canada and Dr. Rongqin Yu, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

  • May 29, 2016 12:58 AM | Anonymous

    TN Romantic Relationship has selected two recent articles to share with you.

    Article 1 by Blunt-Vinti et al. (2016): Assessing Relationship and Sexual Satisfaction in Adolescent Relationships Formed Online and Offline

    Doi link: doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.09.027

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship and sexual satisfaction reported by teens in online- and offline-initiated relationships. Data were collected from 273 13-19 year olds visiting a publicly funded clinic through 2010 and 2011. Questions included where respondents met the partner (online vs. offline), time between meeting and first sex, how well they knew the partner, and relationship and sexual (R&S) satisfaction. R&S satisfaction scores were moderate for adolescents who reported meeting partners online and in person but were statistically higher in offline-initiated relationships. There was an inverse relationship between having an online partner and both relationship and sexual satisfaction. Additionally, knowing partners for a longer period of time and feeling more knowledgeable about partners before having sex were statistically significantly related to higher R&S satisfaction. Results suggest that encouraging teens to wait longer and to get to know their partner(s) better before engaging in sex may improve satisfaction with, and quality of, those relationships.

    Article 2 by Boisvert & Poulin (2016): Romantic Relationship Patterns from Adolescence to Emerging Adulthood: Associations with Family and Peer Experiences in Early Adolescence

    Doi link: DOI 10.1007/s10964-016-0435-0

    The present study identifies and describes romantic relationship patterns from adolescence to adulthood and examines their associations with family and peer experiences in early adolescence. In a 13-year longitudinal study, 281 youth (58 % girls) identified all their romantic partners each year from the ages of 16–24. Dimensions of family relationships (family cohesion, parent–child conflict) and peer relationships (peer likeability, social withdrawal, close friendships, other-sex friendships) were assessed at age 12. Latent class analyses brought out five distinct romantic relationship patterns and significant associations were found with family and peer relationships in early adolescence. These five romantic relationship patterns appeared to follow a continuum of romantic involvement, with romantic relationship patterns situated a both ends of this continuum (later involvement pattern and intense involvement pattern) being associated with more interpersonal experiences in early adolescence.

    We hope you enjoy our selections!

    Professor Jennifer Connolly, York University, Canada and Dr. Rongqin Yu, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

  • April 17, 2016 5:45 AM | Anonymous

    TN Romantic Relationship has selected two recent articles to share with you.

    Article 1 by Larson et al. (2016): With or Without You? Contextualizing the Impact of Romantic Relationship Breakup on Crime Among Serious Adolescent Offenders

    Doi link: DOI 10.1007/s10964-015-0318-9

    This study examined the effects of relationship breakup on crime among justice-involved youth. The author used data from the Pathways to Desistance Study, a longitudinal study of 1354 (14 % female) adjudicated youth from the juvenile and adult court systems in Phoenix and Philadelphia. They found that breakup has criminogenic influence. The study suggests that relationship breakup’s effect on crime is particularly acute among this at-risk sample, contingent upon post-breakup relationship transitions, and more pronounced for relationships that involve cohabitation.

    Article 2 by Byers et al. (2016): Time Out from Sex or Romance: Sexually Experienced Adolescents’ Decisions to Purposefully Avoid Sexual Activity or Romantic Relationships

    Doi link: DOI 10.1007/s10964-016-0447-9

    Sexually experienced adolescents may purposefully avoid engaging in sexual activity for a period of time. This study investigated sexually experienced adolescents’ decisions to purposefully avoid further sexual activity and/or romantic relationships with a focus on how common these decisions are and factors influencing them. Participants were 411 (56 % female) adolescents (16–21 years old) who completed an on-line survey that assessed reasons for each type of avoidance, religiosity, sexual esteem, sexual distress, sexual coercion, and dysfunctional sexual beliefs. It is found that the female adolescents who had avoided sexual activity were more likely to have experienced sexual coercion. The male adolescents who had avoided sexual activity were more religious and likely to have experienced sexual coercion. The male adolescents who had avoided romantic relationships were more sexually distressed and likely to have experienced sexual coercion.

    We hope you enjoy our selections!

    Professor Jennifer Connolly, York University, Canada and Dr. Rongqin Yu, University of Oxford, UK

<< First  < Prev   1   2   Next >  Last >>