Two recent interesting articles on romantic relationship in youths

April 17, 2016 5:45 AM | Deleted user

TN Romantic Relationship has selected two recent articles to share with you.

Article 1 by Larson et al. (2016): With or Without You? Contextualizing the Impact of Romantic Relationship Breakup on Crime Among Serious Adolescent Offenders

Doi link: DOI 10.1007/s10964-015-0318-9

This study examined the effects of relationship breakup on crime among justice-involved youth. The author used data from the Pathways to Desistance Study, a longitudinal study of 1354 (14 % female) adjudicated youth from the juvenile and adult court systems in Phoenix and Philadelphia. They found that breakup has criminogenic influence. The study suggests that relationship breakup’s effect on crime is particularly acute among this at-risk sample, contingent upon post-breakup relationship transitions, and more pronounced for relationships that involve cohabitation.

Article 2 by Byers et al. (2016): Time Out from Sex or Romance: Sexually Experienced Adolescents’ Decisions to Purposefully Avoid Sexual Activity or Romantic Relationships

Doi link: DOI 10.1007/s10964-016-0447-9

Sexually experienced adolescents may purposefully avoid engaging in sexual activity for a period of time. This study investigated sexually experienced adolescents’ decisions to purposefully avoid further sexual activity and/or romantic relationships with a focus on how common these decisions are and factors influencing them. Participants were 411 (56 % female) adolescents (16–21 years old) who completed an on-line survey that assessed reasons for each type of avoidance, religiosity, sexual esteem, sexual distress, sexual coercion, and dysfunctional sexual beliefs. It is found that the female adolescents who had avoided sexual activity were more likely to have experienced sexual coercion. The male adolescents who had avoided sexual activity were more religious and likely to have experienced sexual coercion. The male adolescents who had avoided romantic relationships were more sexually distressed and likely to have experienced sexual coercion.

We hope you enjoy our selections!

Professor Jennifer Connolly, York University, Canada and Dr. Rongqin Yu, University of Oxford, UK